Wednesday, October 9, 2019

It generally takes four years to bring ginseng root to harvest. The Wisconsin cultivated ginseng replicates the way wild ginseng is grown in the forest. During those four years, the farmer works to protect the precious plant from the harsh winter conditions and the strong summer light. A layer of straw is place on the planted beds to protect the plant. In the summer, shade structures are placed over the ginseng, so that the plant is grows in a forest like state. During these four years, the farmer must carefully watch for a variety of things that can ruin the plant, such as animals getting into the garden or if the weather is unusually dry or wet. There are many factors that can have an impact on the final ginseng root.

"Every ounce of ginseng grown in the state of Wisconsin is carefully and properly grown with love, by farmers that have many years of experience. Wisconsin Ginseng is the gold standard for high quality American ginseng. American Ginseng has been cultivated in Wisconsin, U.S., for more than 100 years, dating back to the 1800’s. Today, Wisconsin Ginseng farmers account for 95 percent of the total cultivated American ginseng production of the United States."
Once the root is harvested, it is placed in a cooler where it is refrigerated for 10 to 20 days. After cooling, the roots are washed and fully sorted to remove any remaining debris. After they are cooled and washed, they are placed in a specially designed ginseng dryer. They are dried for 14 days and continually monitored.

After drying, the ginseng roots are sorted by diameter into small, medium, large and extra-large roots. Then, roots in each of those categories are further graded by length. This grading procedure assists buyers in purchasing the exact type of ginseng necessary for their end products. The fibers and prongs are cut off the root in the grading process and can be sold for tea cuts, or grounded into powder for capsules.

The roots are again inspected and placed 125 pound or 57 kilogram barrels, ready for sale to ginseng buyers. Wisconsin Ginseng is sold to consumers around the world seeking its health benefits.
Major Interaction

Do not take this combination

Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with AMERICAN GINSENG
Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. American ginseng has been reported to decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). Decreasing the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin) might increase the risk of clotting. It is unclear why this interaction might occur. To avoid this interaction do not take American ginseng if you take warfarin (Coumadin).

Moderate Interaction


Be cautious with this combination

Medications for depression (MAOIs) interacts with AMERICAN GINSENG
American ginseng might stimulate the body. Some medications used for depression can also stimulate the body. Taking American ginseng along with these medications used for depression might cause side effects such as anxiousness, headache, restlessness, and insomnia. Some of these medications used for depression include phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and others.

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with AMERICAN GINSENG
American ginseng might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking American ginseng along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed. Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.
Possibly Effective for
  • Diabetes. Taking 3 grams of American ginseng by mouth, up to two hours before a meal, can lower blood sugar after a meal in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, larger doses do not seem to have a greater effect. Taking 100-200 mg of American ginseng by mouth for 8 weeks might also help lower pre-meal blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Different American ginseng products may have different effects. Researchers think that is because they contain different amounts of the active chemicals called ginsenosides.
  • Respiratory tract infections. Some research suggests that taking a specific American ginseng extract called CVT-E002 (Cold-FX, Afexa Life Sciences, Canada) 200 mg twice daily for 3-4 months during flu season might prevent cold or flu symptoms in adults between the ages of 18 and 65. People older than 65 seem to need a flu shot at month 2 along with this treatment in order to decrease their risk of getting the flu or colds. This extract also seems to help make symptoms milder and last a shorter length of time when infections do occur. Some evidence suggests that the extract might not reduce the chance of getting the first cold of a season, but it seems to reduce the risk of getting repeat colds in a season. However, it might not help prevent cold or flu-like symptoms in patients with weakened immune systems.
Possibly Ineffective for
  • Athletic performance. Taking 1600 mg of American ginseng by mouth for 4 weeks does not seem to improve athletic performance. But it might decrease muscle damage during exercise.
Insufficient Evidence for
  • Insulin resistance caused by HIV treatment. Early research shows that taking capsules containing 1 gram of American ginseng root three times daily for 14 days while receiving the drug indinavir, which is a type of HIV therapy, does not reduce insulin resistance caused by indinavir in healthy people.
  • Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). There is early evidence that a specific product (AD-fX, Afexa Life Sciences, Canada) containing American ginseng extract in combination with ginkgo leaf extract might help improve ADHD symptoms such as anxiety, hyperactivity, and impulsiveness in children aged 3-17 years.
  • Breast cancer. Some studies conducted in China suggest that breast cancer patients treated with any form of ginseng (American or Panax) do better and feel better. However, this may not be a result of taking the ginseng, because the patients in the study were also more likely to be treated with the prescription cancer drug tamoxifen. It is difficult to know how much of the benefit to attribute to ginseng.
  • Cancer-related fatigue. Research on the effects of American ginseng in people with fatigue related to cancer is not consistent. One study shows that taking 700-2000 mg of American ginseng daily for 8 weeks does not reduce fatigue in people with cancer. However, other research shows that taking 2000 mg of American ginseng in two doses daily for 8 weeks reduces fatigue by 51%. The conflicting results might be due to the different methods used to measure fatigue in the studies.
  • Mental performance. Some research suggests that taking one 100-400 mg dose of American ginseng (Cereboost, Naturex) 1-6 hours before mental tests improves short-term memory and reaction time in healthy people.
  • High blood pressure. Evidence on the effects of American ginseng in people with high blood pressure is not consistent. Some research shows that taking 1500 mg of American ginseng twice daily for 12 weeks does not reduce blood pressure. But other research shows that taking 1000 mg of American ginseng extract three times daily for 12 weeks lowers blood pressure in people with diabetes and high blood pressure. The differences in the research might be related to the amount of ginsenosides, the active chemical in American ginseng, that is contained in the products used.
  • Menopausal symptoms. Early research suggests that taking a product containing American ginseng, black cohosh, dong quai, milk thistle, red clover, and vitex agnus-castus (Phyto-Female Complex, SupHerb, Netanya, Israel) twice daily for 3 months reduces menopausal symptoms, including hot flashes, night sweats, and sleep quality. However, it is not clear if these effects are caused by American ginseng or the other ingredients in the product.
  • Schizophrenia. Early research shows that American ginseng might improve some mental symptoms associated with schizophrenia. Taking 100 mg of a specific American ginseng extract called HT1001 (Afexa Life Sciences, Canada) twice daily for 4 weeks improves the patient’s ability to hold visual information in the mind short-term. This treatment might also reduce some physical side effects of antipsychotic drugs. However, it does not improve other mental symptoms.
  • Bleeding disorders.
  • Digestive disorders.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Memory loss.
  • Dizziness.
  • Pregnancy and childbirth complications.
  • Stress.
  • Anemia.
  • Insomnia.
  • Gastritis.
  • Impotence.
  • Fever.
  • Hangover symptoms.
  • Headaches.
  • Swine flu.
  • Aging.
  • HIV/AIDS.
  • Nerve pain.
  • Fibromyalgia.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate American ginseng for these uses.

Saturday, September 28, 2019

ABOUT AMERICAN GINSENG

Ginseng is a key ingredient used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is also widely used in Western cultures a dietary supplement and botanical element.
There are two types of ginseng. Often both types are taken for a health balancing effect. Consumers take American ginseng for a cooling effect and Asian ginseng for a heating effect.

Thursday, September 26, 2019

Ginseng has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries.

This slow-growing, short plant with fleshy roots can be classified three ways, depending on how long it is grown: fresh, white or red.

Fresh ginseng is harvested before 4 years, while white ginseng is harvested between 4–6 years and red ginseng is harvested after 6 or more years.

There are many types of this herb, but the most popular are American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) and Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng).

American and Asian ginseng vary in their concentration of active compounds and effects on the body. It is believed that American ginseng works as a relaxing agent, whereas the Asian variety has an invigorating effect.

Ginseng contains two significant compounds: ginsenosides and gintonin. These compounds complement one another to provide health benefits.

Here are 7 evidence-based health benefits of ginseng.

1. Potent Antioxidant That May Reduce Inflammation

Ginseng has beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Some test-tube studies have shown that ginseng extracts and ginsenoside compounds could inhibit inflammation and increase antioxidant capacity in cells.

For example, one test-tube study found that Korean red ginseng extract reduced inflammation and improved antioxidant activity is skin cells from people with eczema.

The results are promising in humans, as well.

One study investigated the effects of having 18 young male athletes take 2 grams of Korean red ginseng extract three times per day for seven days.

The men then had levels of certain inflammatory markers tested after performing an exercise test. These levels were significantly lower than in the placebo group, lasting for up to 72 hours after testing.

However, it should be noted that the placebo group got a different medicinal herb, so these results should be taken with a grain of salt and more studies are needed.

Lastly, a larger study followed 71 postmenopausal women who took 3 grams of red ginseng or a placebo daily for 12 weeks. Antioxidant activity and oxidative stress markers were then measured.

Researchers concluded that red ginseng may help reduce oxidative stress by increasing antioxidant enzyme activities.

2. May Benefit Brain Function

Ginseng could help improve brain functions like memory, behavior and mood.

Some test-tube and animal studies show that components in ginseng, like ginsenosides and compound K, could protect the brain against damage caused by free radicals.

One study followed 30 healthy people who consumed 200 mg of Panax ginseng daily for four weeks. At the end of the study, they showed improvement in mental health, social functioning and mood.

However, these benefits stopped being significant after 8 weeks, suggesting that ginseng effects might decrease with extended use.

Another study examined how single doses of either 200 or 400 mg of Panax ginseng affected mental performance, mental fatigue and blood sugar levels in 30 healthy adults before and after a 10-minute mental test.

The 200-mg dose, as opposed to the 400-mg dose, was more effective at improving mental performance and fatigue during the test.

It is possible that ginseng assisted the uptake of blood sugar by cells, which could have enhanced performance and reduced mental fatigue. Yet it is not clear why the lower dose was more effective than the higher one.

A third study found that taking 400 mg of Panax ginseng daily for eight days improved calmness and math skills.

What’s more, other studies found positive effects on brain function and behavior in people with Alzheimer's disease.

3. Could Improve Erectile Dysfunction

Research has shown that ginseng may be a useful alternative for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) in men.

It seems that compounds in it may protect against oxidative stress in blood vessels and tissues in the penis and help restore normal function.

Additionally, studies have shown that ginseng may promote the production of nitric oxide, a compound that improves muscle relaxation in the penis and increases blood circulation.

One study found that men treated with Korean red ginseng had a 60% improvement in ED symptoms, compared to 30% improvement produced by a medication used to treat ED.

Moreover, another study showed that 86 men with ED had significant improvements in erectile function and overall satisfaction after taking 1,000 mg of aged ginseng extract for 8 weeks.

However, more studies are needed to draw definite conclusions about the effects of ginseng on ED.

4. May Boost the Immune System

Ginseng may strengthen the immune system.

Some studies exploring its effects on the immune system have focused on cancer patients undergoing surgery or chemotherapy treatment.

One study followed 39 people who were recovering from surgery for stomach cancer, treating them with 5,400 mg of ginseng daily for two years.

Interestingly, these people had significant improvements in immune functions and a lower recurrence of symptoms.

Another study examined the effect of red ginseng extract on immune system markers in people with advanced stomach cancer undergoing post-surgery chemotherapy.

After three months, those taking red ginseng extract had better immune system markers than those in the control or placebo group.

Furthermore, a study suggested that people who take ginseng could have up to a 35% higher chance of living disease-free for five years after curative surgery and up to a 38% higher survival rate compared to those not taking it.

It seems that ginseng extract could enhance the effect of vaccinations against diseases like influenza, as well.

Even though these studies show improvements in immune system markers in people with cancer, more research is needed to demonstrate the efficacy of ginseng in boosting resistance to infections in healthy people.

5. May Have Potential Benefits Against Cancer

Ginseng may be helpful in reducing the risk of certain cancers.

Ginsenosides in this herb have been shown to help reduce inflammation and provide antioxidant protection.

The cell cycle is the process by which cells normally grow and divide. Ginsenosides could benefit this cycle by preventing abnormal cell production and growth.

A review of several studies concluded that people who take ginseng may have a a 16% lower risk of developing cancer.

Moreover, an observational study suggested that people taking ginseng could be less likely to develop certain types of cancer, such as lip, mouth, esophagus, stomach, colon, liver and lung cancer, than those who do not take it.

Ginseng may also help improve the health of patients undergoing chemotherapy, reduce side effects and enhance the effect of some treatment drugs.

While studies on the role of ginseng in cancer prevention show some benefits, they remain inconclusive.

6. May Fight Tiredness and Increase Energy Levels

Ginseng has been shown to help fight fatigue and promote energy.

Various animal studies have linked some components in ginseng, like polysaccharides and oligopeptides, with lower oxidative stress and higher energy production in cells, which could help fight fatigue.

One four-week study explored the effects of giving 1 or 2 grams of Panax ginseng or a placebo to 90 people with chronic fatigue.

Those given Panax ginseng experienced less physical and mental fatigue, as well as reductions in oxidative stress, than those taking the placebo.

Another study gave 364 cancer survivors experiencing fatigue 2,000 mg of American ginseng or a placebo. After eight weeks, those in the ginseng group had significantly lower fatigue levels than those in the placebo group.

Furthermore, a review of over 155 studies suggested that ginseng supplements may not only help reduce fatigue but also enhance physical activity.

7. Could Lower Blood Sugar

Ginseng seems to be beneficial in the control of blood glucose in people both with and without diabetes.

American and Asian ginseng have been shown to improve pancreatic cell function, boost insulin production and enhance the uptake of blood sugar in tissues.

Moreover, studies show that ginseng extracts help by providing antioxidant protection that reduce free radicals in the cells of those with diabetes.

One study assessed the effects of 6 grams of Korean red ginseng, along with the usual anti-diabetic medication or diet, in 19 people with type 2 diabetes.

Interestingly, they were able to maintain good blood sugar control throughout the 12-week study. They also had an 11% decrease in blood sugar levels, a 38% decrease in fasting insulin and a 33% increase in insulin sensitivity.

Another study showed that American ginseng helped improve blood sugar levels in 10 healthy people after they performed a sugary drink test.

It seems that fermented red ginseng could be even more effective at blood sugar control. Fermented ginseng is produced with the help of live bacteria that transform the ginsenosides into a more easily absorbed and potent form.Trusted Source

In fact, a study demonstrated that taking 2.7 grams of fermented red ginseng daily was effective at lowering blood sugar and increasing insulin levels after a test meal, compared to a placebo.

www.healthline.com
Volume 0%



Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Overview Information

American ginseng (Panax quinquefolis) is an herb that grows mainly in North America. Wild American ginseng is in such high demand that it has been declared a threatened or endangered species in some states in the United States.

People take American ginseng by mouth for stress, to boost the immune system, and as a stimulant.

American ginseng is often used to fight infections such as colds and flu. There is some evidence that it might help prevent colds and flu and make symptoms milder when infections do occur.

American ginseng is used for other infections including HIV/AIDS, infections of the intestine (dysentery), and particular infections (Pseudomonas infections) that are common in people with cystic fibrosis.

Some people use American ginseng to improve digestion and for loss of appetite, as well as for vomiting, inflammation of the colon (colitis), and inflammation of the lining of the stomach (gastritis).

American ginseng is also used for low iron in the blood (anemia), diabetes, insulin resistance related to HIV treatments, cancer-related fatigue, high blood pressure, trouble sleeping (insomnia), nerve pain, erectile dysfunction (ED), fever, hangover symptoms, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), blood and bleeding disorders, breast cancer, dizziness, headaches, convulsions, fibromyalgia, “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), memory loss, rheumatoid arthritis, schizophrenia, improving athletic performance, improving mental performance, as an anti-aging aid, menopausal symptoms, complications during pregnancy or childbirth, and for nervous exhaustion (neurasthenia).

You may also see American ginseng listed as an ingredient in some soft drinks. Oils and extracts made from American ginseng are used in soaps and cosmetics.

Don’t confuse American ginseng with Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) or Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng). They have different medicinal effects.


How does it work?

American ginseng contains chemicals called ginsenosides that seem to affect insulin levels in the body and lower blood sugar. Other chemicals, called polysaccharides, might affect the immune system.

Monday, September 23, 2019

American ginseng is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately, short-term. Doses of 100-3000 mg daily have been used safely for up to 12 weeks. Single doses of up to 10 grams have also been safely used. In addition, a specific American ginseng extract called CVT-E002 (Cold-FX, Afexa Life Sciences, Canada) has also been used safely for up to 4 months.

When taken by mouth, American ginseng can cause some side effects including diarrhea, itching, trouble sleeping (insomnia), headache, and nervousness. In some people, American ginseng might also cause rapid heartbeat, increased blood pressure or decreased blood pressure, breast tenderness, vaginal bleeding in women, and other side effects. Uncommon side effects that have been reported include a severe rash called Stevens-Johnson syndrome, liver damage, and severe allergic reaction.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Children: American ginseng is POSSIBLY SAFE for children when taken by mouth appropriately, short-term. A specific American ginseng extract called CVT-E002 (Cold-FX, Afexa Life Sciences, Canada) has been used in doses of 4.5-26 mg daily for 3 days in children 3-12 years-old.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: American ginseng is POSSIBLY UNSAFE in pregnancy. One of the chemicals in Panax ginseng, a plant related to American ginseng, has been linked to possible birth defects. Do not take American ginseng if you are pregnant.

There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking American ginseng if you are breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Diabetes: American ginseng might lower blood sugar. In people with diabetes who are taking medications to lower blood sugar, adding American ginseng might lower it too much. Monitor your blood sugar closely if you have diabetes and use American ginseng.

Hormone-sensitive conditions such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: American ginseng preparations that contain chemicals called ginsenosides might act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don’t use American ginseng that contains ginsenosides. However, some American ginseng extracts have had the ginsenosides removed (Cold-fX, Afexa Life Sciences, Canada). American ginseng extracts such as these that contain no ginsenosides or contain only a low concentration of ginsenosides do not appear to act like estrogen.

Trouble sleeping (insomnia): High doses of American ginseng have been linked with insomnia. If you have trouble sleeping, use American ginseng with caution.

Schizophrenia (a mental disorder): High doses of American ginseng have been linked with sleep problems and agitation in people with schizophrenia . Be careful when using American ginseng if you have schizophrenia.

Surgery: American ginseng might affect blood sugar levels and might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking American ginseng at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

7 Proven Health Benefits of Ginseng

Ginseng has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. This slow-growing, short plant with fleshy roots can be classified ...

To order by full barrells, please contact:

Name

Email *

Message *

Video